RPC 12

October 24, 1986

Revealing Confidential Information to Correct a Mistake

 

Opinion rules that a lawyer may reveal confidential information to correct a mistake if disclosure is impliedly authorized by the client.

 

Inquiry:

 

In 1984 Lawyer L was asked by a mobile home sales organization to prepare two deeds. One deed was for conveyance of certain real estate from a husband and wife to the mobile home sales organization. The second deed was to convey the same property from the mobile home sales organization to a financial corporation. Since then, a representative of the mobile home sales organization informed Lawyer L that the deeds should, in fact, have been a deed of trust to secure the mobile home sales organization, which would have assigned it and the note secured thereby to the financing corporation. Lawyer L has written the mobile home sales organization advising its representative that the property should be put back in the names of the original grantors and a proper deed of trust from them should be put on the record. To date, the mobile home sales organization has not, as far as Lawyer L is aware, attempted to get the instruments changed from deeds to a deed of trust. Lawyer L has not contacted the original land owners.

 

What duty does Lawyer L owe the original land owners concerning advising them of the status of their title? Since the mobile home sales organization has not responded to Lawyer L's recommendations to straighten out the title problems, what duty does Lawyer L owe that organization?

 

Opinion:

 

Lawyer L was employed by the mobile home sales organization, and the information he received from the mobile home sales organization was given to him in his capacity as the organization's attorney. The statements by the mobile home sales organization representative indicating that the deeds were not the documents which should have been drawn up and executed are "confidential information" within the meaning of Rule 4(a). Rule 4(b) prohibits the lawyer from revealing confidential information except as permitted by Rule 4(c). In this situation it would appear that Lawyer L is, in the absence of specific instructions to the contrary, impliedly authorized to disclose the nature of the problem to the original land owners and suggest corrective action under Rule 4(c)(1). If, however, the mobile home sales organization has forbidden disclosure, Lawyer L is obligated to maintain confidentiality. Since it is apparent that suffering the mistake to continue uncorrected would ultimately cause inconvenience, expense, and perhaps injustice, Lawyer L should call upon his client pursuant to Rule 7.2 (b)(l) to rectify the situation and, if the client refuses to do so, Lawyer L should discontinue the representation. It would also appear that Lawyer L might properly contact the original land owners and advise them pursuant to Rule 7.4 (b) that they may wish to secure the advice of independent counsel in regard to the transaction.

 


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